eBooks and ISBNs

I’m checking into the available options for book ID numbers when publishing digitally. Publishers of eBooks are almost as different as there are numbers of said publishers available on the Web.

Both Kindle Direct Publishing and Nook Press assign proprietary (recognized as meaningful only to them) identification numbers to each book published through their services in order to track sales. This process may be appealing to authors just getting started who don’t have the knowledge or the time to investigate or who just want to see what appeal their book might have – no real money is lost.

If you have an ISBN (International Standard Book Number), you can add it to the rest of your book’s information and it will be included with the proprietary number. If I understand correctly, oftentimes that ISBN number can only be identified with that electronic version of your book. If you choose to publish a print version of your book, or, republish through a different digital publisher, you must get a separate ISBN.

In contrast, a publisher like Smashwords provides the ISBN for you, free of charge. This publisher also distributes eBooks to several third party channels, such as Apple iBooks, kobo, blio, Barnes & Noble, and more – but not to Amazon. As the publisher, Smashwords still has some control over your book, as all other print or digital publisher do.

That ISBN has been sort of a status symbol, “Yes, I’ve been published. Here’s the ISBN number, look it up.” And many people do research books using the ISBN number – that’s what it’s for, especially if your book is published globally.

There is an excellent blog post at the Tools of Change for Publishing Web site on this subject, interviewing the product manager at Bowker, the official U.S. distributor of ISBNs. The post is a year old, but you should read it.

If you want a little more control over your eBook distribution, you can purchase your own ISBN from Bowker – even self-publish. It’s a little daunting, though, to realize that a single ISBN number costs $125.00. You can buy 10 numbers for $295.00 – the better deal at less than $30 a number, to be sure, but still quite a chunk of change for most of us. Do I use the free ISBN from Smashword or take more ownership of my book?

I don’t know yet, but the clock is ticking on that deadline.

You have to make your own informed choice.

 

Digitalizing Your Book for ePublishing

That’s my next project for a book that was published several years ago and is now out of print. The copyright has reverted back to me and I plan to take advantage (I hope) of the eBook industry. I no longer have a digital copy of this book – over 500 pages long – so I’ve decided to find someone to do that for me. Just doing a Google search pulls up so many options it’ll take you days to research all sites.

However, if you are working with a digital copy, the best option is probably the free publishing through Kindle Direct Publishing and Nook Press, which also offer print and lending library services, as well as access to a community of authors and experts. This is my plan for my recent and current projects. You can’t beat the price – and the opportunities,

Many other companies specialize in scanning printed book pages, either bound or unbound, using OCR (optical character recognition), and converting soft copies into eBook format compatible to most retailers, even creating audio books or actually publishing the eBook. In fact, there are so many options out there, I’m still doing my internet homework. I’m also checking out available resource materials and the option to speak to someone in person to ask direct questions.

Some companies also create proofs and then send those proofs back to you. You can do additional edits and send the book back for modification and then converting into the eBook format, even providing cover art – for additional costs. Many companies will distribute the final eBook to global retailers – for additional costs. Claims exist for anything from 85% to 100% sales compensation to authors.

Do your research and compare costs, compensation, copyright, and distribution channels, review contracts, if any, and make a list of what you can afford, as well as your preferences and priorities. Don’t commit to more than you can afford! Find the company that best fits your needs.

Then, take a chance (and keep your day job). We can only hope we sell more than a handful of books!

Need a Little Push Past Your Writer’s Block?

We all reach that point at least once, if not several times, during our writing project where we come up blank. Sometimes just standing up and walking around or stretching does the trick. Other times, a few hours away doing something completely different helps clear your mind. Occasionally, moving on to a different scene helps you go back to the stalled point with a new idea. Then there are the times when you just can’t move forward at all.

Next time you’re stuck, try one of the writing tricks that have worked for me in the past – that is, when I am most disciplined.

  • Flash Fiction Fun – (my favorite) Open a dictionary, newspaper, or other book to a random page, close your eyes and then place your finger anywhere on the page. Write down the word under (or nearest) your finger. Repeat this process three more times and then write a complete fiction piece in 2 – 6 sentences, no more than 100 words, and no holds barred. You may be surprised at the result and you should definitely find your path back to your project.
  • Writing Prompt – Go online and search for “writing prompts.” Search results will provide scores of sites with truly useful ideas to kick start your creative process. The two best sources, in my opinion, are Writers Digest and Poets & Writers. Complete the exercise, even two, then go back to your project.
  • Brainstorm Intervention – Call a few friends together and summarize your problem. If they’re not familiar with your current project, have someone read the page right before your progress stopped. Then for the next 5 minutes have them call out ideas for your next move – even outrageous suggestions. Take the idea that least fits your plotline and write a page on it before you take up the idea that most fits your plotline and then go back to your project.

Most important, have fun and don’t give up.

Point of View – How Do You Choose?

Understanding the point of view devices used in fiction writing – even movies and documentaries – is often a confusing process. Terms such as, first person, third person, objective, omniscient, or limited omniscient can give a writer the vapors. Each method has its advantages and drawbacks.

A writer has to make the point of view decision fit into a “trifecta” of good narrative – the plotline/action, the characters (well-developed, of course) in relation to each other, and the perspective from which the journey is revealed to the readers.

The first book I finished was in third person. I presented several characters’ points of view throughout the book. There were many individuals on the protagonist’s “side” so I felt they had a shared experience, although they didn’t all receive the same amount of attention to their part in the story.

I had to be careful to reveal just enough of each character’s thoughts to move the plot forward. I didn’t want me, as the author, to intrude upon the readers’ discovery and involvement in the journey. And that’s why the bad guys’ point of view was never revealed. The antagonist and all his followers were seen only from the good guys’ perspective.

I have just about wrapped up my second book, unrelated to the first. Because I really wanted to concentrate on the main character’s struggle to mature and take on a serious, and seriously dangerous, responsibility, first person was my choice for point of view.

I struggled in the first couple of chapters with the first person past tense and just could not get the rhythm of the story going. I switched to first person present tense, and I immediately felt a real kinship with my character. The hardest part of first person is to not start every other sentence with “I” – difficult sometimes, but not impossible.

The important lesson I learned with both experiences is that a writer must feel comfortable, must honestly see that the point of view contributes to the story’s success.

Here are some sites that discuss the literary point of view conundrum.

Annenberg Learner

The Writer’s Craft

Novel Writing Help

Sheila Larang on Prezi