Joseph Campbell, an Inspiration to Creative Writers

Writers are, typically, curious beings, so we find inspiration in many places, people, television, movies, books, history, even newspapers. For me, one of the most profound sources is Joseph Campbell’s The Hero With A Thousand Faces, first published in 1949. I purchased my latest copy a few months ago (not sure how I lost the first one I had) at a used book store. I also own several other books by Campbell. I can’t help myself.

As described on the Joseph Campbell Foundation Web site, Campbell was a traveler, professor, editor, writer, public speaker, philosopher, and, more importantly, the bridge between myths and our own lives. For The Hero With A Thousand Faces, he won the National Institute of Arts and Letters Award for Contributions to Creative Literature. And there were many more awards to follow through the years.

Ever heard the phrase, “follow your bliss?” That was Joseph Campbell. Do you know where George Lucas’ inspiration for Star Wars came from? That was The Hero with a Thousand Faces by Joseph Campbell.

He was brought into the spotlight in 1988, after his death in 1987, through the PBS program, Joseph Campbell and The Power of Myth with Bill Moyers. (I’ve got the DVD!)

I have always loved reading myths, Greek, Roman, Native American, Irish; but it wasn’t until I started reading Joseph Campbell that I realized why these narratives so resonated with me. Campbell’s description of the “monomyth” (a word he borrowed from James Joyce after contributing to A Skeleton Key to Finnegans Wake: Unlocking James Joyce’s Masterwork), is a universal pattern that is the essence of, and common to, heroic tales in every culture.

And those tales continue today through creative writing, whether we write mysteries, science fiction, romance, fantasy adventure – all influenced by myth and inspired by Joseph Campbell’s need to know, understand, and share the art of “following your bliss.”